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Mens Summer Cashmere Watchmans Cap The Elder Statesman pD0jfc2
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30-Year-Old Who Was Evicted by Parents Says He's Not a Millennial Because He's Conservative
New York
30-Year-Old Who Was Evicted by Parents Says He's Not a Millennial Because He's Conservative

They are the most threatening and exciting generation since the baby boomers brought about social revolution, not because they're trying to take over the Establishment but because they're growing up without one. The Industrial Revolution made individuals far more powerful--they could move to a city, start a business, read and form organizations. The information revolution has further empowered individuals by handing them the technology to compete against huge organizations: hackers vs. corporations, bloggers vs. newspapers, terrorists vs. nation-states, YouTube directors vs. studios, app-makers vs. entire industries. Millennials don't need us. That's why we're scared of them.

In the U.S., millennials are the children of baby boomers, who are also known as the Me Generation, who then produced the Me Me Me Generation, whose selfishness technology has only exacerbated. Whereas in the 1950s families displayed a wedding photo, a school photo and maybe a military photo in their homes, the average middle-class American family today walks amid 85 pictures of themselves and their pets. Millennials have come of age in the era of the quantified self, recording their daily steps on FitBit, their whereabouts every hour of every day on PlaceMe and their genetic data on 23 and Me. They have less civic engagement and lower political participation than any previous group. This is a generation that would have made Walt Whitman wonder if maybe they should try singing a song of someone else.

Schmeidler and Maher 14 had 24 students in two undergraduate psychology classes rate 5-minute excerpts of videotapes of five psi-conducive and five psi-inhibitory experimenters on a 40-item adjective checklist. The authors classified the experimenters based on their recent research. The psi-conducive experimenters were rated as significantly more flexible, enthusiastic, free, likeable, playful, and warm, but less rigid, cold, overconfident, irritable, egotistic, tense, and dull than the psi-inhibitory experimenters. Edge and Farkash 15 reported a close-to-strict replication of this study with a larger sample of 133 students rating six of the tapes (three of each classification) used by Schmeidler. They used a 28-item adjective checklist with some items overlapping Schmeidler’s checklist. The psi-conducive experimenters were rated as significantly more active, nervous, and enthusiastic, but less poised, egoistic, and cold than the psi-inhibitory experimenters.

Stanford’s psi-mediated instrumental response (PMIR) model essentially proposes that people are constantly scanning the external environment for information relevant to their needs or desires and then act on this information without being consciously aware of it. 16 Until the introduction of this model, parapsychologists generally assumed that the psi source in psi experiments is always the participant. The PMIR model and the experiments that support it destroyed that assumption by demonstrating that a person can produce a psi effect without intending to do so, provided that the effect fulfills a need or desire. In most psi experiments, the PIs (assuming they favor the psi hypothesis, as is the case for the majority of parapsychologists) have at least as strong a need or desire for a positive outcome as their participants. There is nothing keeping them from using their own psi unconsciously and unintentionally to make their wish come true. In fact, epsi fulfills all of Stanford’s criteria for PMIR except the third one: ‘…without prior sensory knowledge even of the existence of the need-relevant circumstance’. 17

It is obvious how epsi could occur in psychokinesis (PK) experiments: The experimenter does essentially the same thing the purported participant does, but (presumably) unconsciously and unintentionally. With AC, the situation is more complicated. There are three possible mechanisms. The first is a two-stage process based on classical physics: (a) the experimenter gains knowledge of the target by AC (perhaps by active percipient telepathy, in which the percipient ‘grabs’ the information from the sender); and (b) the experimenter then plants the target information in the mind of the participant by active sender telepathy. These steps are entirely unconscious for both experimenter and participant.

The second is an application of theories based on quantum mechanics, in which the psi process is not further reducible. Such processes are sometimes called ‘goal-oriented’. The third mechanism is developed in decision augmentation theory (DAT). 18 DAT postulates that the participant precognizes the target stream and initiates the trial or run at a point at which the immediately succeeding, to-be-analyzed target sequence is statistically significant, which occurs by chance 5% of the time assuming random output of the RNG. DAT is applied primarily, and its formalism applies exclusively, to RNG-type experiments ostensibly measuring AP. 19

Colorín Colorado is a national multimedia project that offers a wealth of bilingual, research-based information, activities, and advice for educators and families of English language learners (ELLs). Colorín Colorado is an educational service of WETA, the flagship public broadcasting station in the nation's capital, and receives major funding from the American Federation of Teachers and National Education Association. © Copyright 2017 WETA Public Broadcasting.

Artwork by Caldecott Award-winning illustrator David Diaz and Pura Belpr­é Award-winning illustrator Rafael López is used with permission. Homepage illustrations ©2009 by Rafael López originally appeared in "Book Fiesta" by Pat Mora and used with permission from HarperCollins.

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